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How to create content clients & patients will love - Episode 6
Ronit Levy
Jun 13, 2022

 

Therapists, coaches, healers, and values-driven business owners want to know how to create content their clients and patients will love.  Although there are tons of trends and platforms to keep track of, creating great content that resonates doesn’t have to be difficult.  Focus on being consistent, showing up with integrity, making an impact, and building a long-term relationship with your community.  If you use these guiding principles, you’ll build the know, like, and trust factor on any platform. Trust never goes out of style.

Meet Julia Clementson, Creative Consultant

 

Julia Clementson on Business in Between Podcast

 

Julia specializes in creating content for businesses that want to get the most out of how they show up online.  These information assets include websites, social media posts, articles, and other forms of content marketing.

 

She also emphasizes building connections with your clients and communities instead of chasing passing trends.

 

Julia’s content marketing strategies focus on showing up with integrity. This way, your audience will trust and stick with you even as your business changes.

 

How to create content your ideal clients or patients will love – key points:

 

Stories are an effective way to connect with your audience.

 

Coaches, healers, therapists, and values-driven business owners want to connect with their audience. Stories are a great way to do this. There’s no right or wrong way to tell a good story. Instead, it’s about understanding who the target audience is and clearly communicating how you can help them. 

 

A good story is relevant to ideal clients and their needs.

 

Speak about how your solution helps them achieve what they want or feel a certain way. You can do this through different types of content like videos, blog posts, and social networks.

 

Don’t just say you’re an expert.

 

In any piece of content, use simple language to show potential clients your experiences, successes, and the results you’ve helped others achieve. Emphasize the results they’ll get when working with you.

 

 

People want to buy from businesses they can connect with.

 

The public is more distrustful of larger global brands.  They want to support local businesses, people they can build a relationship with, and brands that align with their values.  A good story highlights your values and makes it easier for your target audience to relate to you.

 

 

Stop chasing marketing and business trends.

 

Use your strengths to communicate your message. Pick marketing strategies and the type of content that brings out the best in you.  Then, show up consistently.

 

Use the right level of formality for your field and audience.

 

The level of formality in your marketing depends on your business, target market, and industry.  Small, local businesses can be less formal and more relatable.  Your messaging has to align with what your potential clients need to see and hear to feel comfortable hiring you.

 

Avoid this common content marketing error.

 

A common content marketing mistake business owners make:  Following the rule that you should talk to your target audience as if they are the past version of you before you solved whatever problem you’re going to help them with.

 

This is a mistake because it narrows down who you can appeal to.

 

A better content strategy involves thinking about who can benefit from the solution you offer and the specific reasons why. This allows you to broaden your audience and services while still staying relevant.

 

Create a consistent story that you can tweak as your business goals change.

 

You can’t reinvent yourself or create urgency that isn’t there. People are sophisticated enough to spot that lack of authenticity. You don’t want your target audience to associate negative feelings or experiences with you.

 

Tweak your content based on the platform you’re using.

 

People interact with content differently based on the platform they’re using.  Additionally, different social networks have their own culture and types of content. Test out different ways to present your information. See what types of content resonate the most with your audience.

 

Sales pages don’t need to be long in order to be effective.

 

A good sales process doesn’t need to be long and complicated. Focus on clearly communicating the offer, how it meets your clients’ needs and a clear call to action.

 

Use buttons with a Call-to-Action in them to break up your copy.

 

Every time you introduce new information on a sales page or a service page, put a “buy now” or “contact me” button.  You never know what piece of information will make someone want to buy your product or work with you.  Make sure there’s a button they can click on when they have that thought.

 

Describe the experience of working with you, not just the benefits.

 

Throughout your content marketing, talk about how the experience of working with you and/or using your product is different.  It’s likely that you have strengths that you take for granted.You may have to ask other people for feedback about what sets you apart from your competition.  Highlight what makes you different.

 

Being ethical and trustworthy never goes out of style.

 

Stop chasing trends and trying to be everywhere.  Types of content and social networks will continue to change really quickly. Instead, develop a content strategy that allows you to be consistent, helpful, and relatable over time.

Resources

 

 

To learn more about Julia and the content creation services she provides, please visit her website: https://juliaclementson.com/

 

 

If you want exclusive content and tools to help you grow your SEO, business and marketing without all of the overwhelm, join the Simple SEO Systems email community.

 

Go to www.SimpleSEOSystems.com to sign up right now on the homepage. 

 

 

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

Julia, welcome!  I’m so excited to have you as a guest today, and to introduce you to my audience. Julia is a creative consultant. She specializes in creating content for businesses that want to get the most out of how they show up online. She also emphasizes building connections with your clients and communities instead of chasing passing trends.

 

Both of those things have been super important in my work with you, and also in people who I know who have worked with you, they’ve really loved that those are two things you really stand for. And today you’re talking with us about your business journey, as well as how telling a really good story is a key part to building a strong brand.

 

Julia:

 

Well thank you for having me. It’s a pleasure to be here. Like a lot of business owners. I don’t really have a riveting story to tell I’m an editor for Z magazine and I develop content there, right? But of course I have my own business where I build brand assets. And when I say brand assets, this means everything from social media to websites and everything in between, basically any medium where you can distribute content to your audience.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

And what do people tend to seek you out for? What are the questions people are asking? What are they missing, where they’re like, I need to work with Julia.

 

Julia:

 

They’re usually looking for a good story. Mm-Hmm <affirmative> or a way to communicate with their audience. Of course a good story is subjective. There’s no wrong or right way to tell a good story. It’s really about understanding who the target is and what the business is about.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

So what makes a good story? Because we hear about storytelling so much. We hear that humans are wired for stories, and we know that most people are just a sucker for a good story. What actually makes a good story?

 

Julia:

 

Well, your audience will have fresh eyes when they see your business, whether it’s online in real life or however they see you. And a good story depends on what they need. So coming to me for an answer of what a good story looks like, I wanna say, it’s not the best idea instead of focusing on what my idea of a good story is or what your idea of a good story is, focus on who your target is and what their idea of a good story is. And that all comes down to relevance.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

I’ve heard you say that before. What does that mean?

 

Julia:

 

Okay. So think about your business as it relates to your audience, how can you help them and is really giving context to who you are and what you do when you describe what you do and you put forward your benefits, your features, and how you can help improve the lives of your customers.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

So what is it that our potential clients are looking for when they’re reading through our websites, our social media, anything that we put out

 

Julia:

 

Well, they’re looking for benefits, and they’re looking for the benefits of the benefits. So if you’re selling a product that saves time, you don’t just tell people, you can save time when you purchase this show people rather how well they can use this free time. If you’re selling a vacuum cleaner or like those little iRobot things, mm-hmm, <affirmative>, you know, you’re saving time and energy from cleaning, but with that time, what can you do with it? Or if you are a coach, you are helping someone to restore balance into their life. And what does that really look like from there?

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

So it’s how your solution helps them get to what they wanna achieve or how they want to feel.

 

Julia:

 

Right? So a good story, especially if it’s about you, if you’re explain why you’re the best option, of course, you need to talk about your business, but nobody wants to build a relationship with a company that’s self-centered. So of course you need to get in front of a story with, I can help you with this, but don’t just say you’re an expert in the field, show them your experiences, your achievements, your past clients, your successes, and show them how this makes you an expert in your field. How does this make you the best option in your field and what are the results that they can get from working with you or buying your own product or anything along that line? If you can show that you’re an expert in the field by explaining what you do, very simply without using heavy jargon or relying on technical slang or anything, then you’re showing expertise. There’s a finesse with telling a good story. When it comes to understanding what your audience understands about you mm-hmm <affirmative> or what they don’t understand and filling that gap.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

I’ve seen that a lot in many websites that I’ve worked on, where they’re written by a professional for what seems like a professional audience mm-hmm <affirmative> and I’ll even ask business owners sometimes. Do you work with a lot of people in your field or do you tend to work with people who are highly educated? And most of the time I know the answer I’m going to get back is yes. And they go, how did you know that? And I said, because most people read at the fourth to sixth grade level, and you are writing easily at the college level, which tells me that you are used to talking a certain way with your clients, but you have to understand that’s only going to appeal to that small group.

 

Julia:

 

If you wanna come across as a ultra professional corporate firm, then yes, maybe how technical language is a way to go. But for a lot of small and medium sized businesses, your target audience is someone in the neighborhood and you need to be able to connect with them. And that’s why we see a rise in personal brands, especially with digital marketing, everybody’s accessible. And because everyone is accessible, it seems like no one is accessible because there’s so much noise to cut through right now, you might see people are a little more distrustful of larger global brands and are seeking to support local brands, smaller companies, people that they can build a relationship with, or if they can see there, you share ethical values and things like that. And of course, when you tell a good story, you wanna incorporate these elements into your story and you build your personal brand.

 

Julia:

 

Based on that, what I see as a, hang up, some entrepreneurs face along that line mm-hmm <affirmative> is setting that boundary between I’m a business. So I am a corporate entity, but I’m also the face of it. Right? And how do I create a boundary where I have privacy? I don’t want to share everything about me, but I also want to share the things that are relevant to my audience. Some people are naturally a bit more reserved and some people are a bit more extroverted and a bit more outgoing and will speak more freely. And there’s nothing wrong with either. Everyone’s different. It’s about understanding your business, understanding your own tendencies and how you think your audience is going to react to that there’s no wrong or right way to do it, but there are better and worse. The good news about being an entrepreneur is that you set that for yourself.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

I’m really glad you brought that up because I think a lot of smaller businesses feel pressure to show up as bigger than they are, because they are trying to compete with either bigger competitors in their market or just bigger competitors in their industry. And they don’t know how to put their message and their values into words because they lose connection with who they actually are.

 

Julia:

 

Trend seems impossible. Mm-Hmm <affirmative> today. This is the new trending hashtag. And tomorrow it will be completely different or few minutes from now. It might be different. You need to understand how is your target going to communicate? So look at what platforms they’re using, where they are, and what’s your best mode of communication. If you’re not competing with your strengths, then you’re already losing all on the market. If you know, your strengths are maybe in blogs or in a written form, or maybe you’re good at video, mm-hmm <affirmative> then use play to those strengths. It doesn’t make sense to play with your weakest hand.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

I 100% agree with that. And I ask most of my clients right in the initial engagement meeting that we have, what kind of marketing brings out the best in you? And most of them actually can’t answer that because they’re trying, or they’ve tried so many things, but they’ve lost sight of that.

 

Julia:

 

That’s the thing about business. You won’t know what your strengths are, unless of course you’ve tried and pushed boundaries. If you’re going to step outside of your wheelhouse or explore your boundaries, do so in a way that’s incremental. Don’t just do everything all at once. Let’s say people aren’t sure what boundaries to cross, especially on social media. You’ll see a lot of people on social media with a hashtag entrepreneurship journey. I think people know behind the scenes of how things work, right? And that’s good. And well, it works for some people. And I think it’s overwhelming, especially for businesses that aren’t savvy with digital marketing, who see that they have to show up with daily vlogs or do TikTok reels and try to jump on any free bandwagon to stay relevant because that’s what people are doing right now. The best way to cut through noise isn’t to shout louder sometimes. So silence can be strength.

 

Dr. Levy:

 

Absolutely.

 

Julia:

 

When I think about clients and how they explain themselves, you’ll see maybe when they write a bio on a website or on social media, they’ll have this part where they personalize their business. Let’s say, you’re going to your dentist website. Do you need to know if they like dogs or not? Is that a crucial part of their bio? Maybe not, but you need to think about why would someone put that into their congregating? So when people go to the dentist, there’s a couple of fears associated with dental care and that’s loss of control in the situation. Mm-Hmm, <affirmative>, they’re either embarrassed about their dental health or just scared of pain, right?

 

And the mouth is a sensitive region. And letting people know that I’m not just a dentist, but I’m a person I’m normal. I’m just like you I’m easygoing. So you should be comfortable in my space that that’s a big part of creating a personal brand around your practice that can help ease some of these anxieties. You’re not just telling people, oh, don’t worry. We have stuff that could tell to ease the pain. When you come in mm-hmm <affirmative> or I can help you with your anxiety. If you feel you can ask questions, telling people that won’t hurt, but letting people to know that, you know, this is, I’m a person I can communicate with you. I’m real. And you can feel comfortable with me.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

The dentist example is so right on, because as you were describing that, what came to mind is my daughter’s dentist, who is brilliant on his website, on his, about page Uhhuh. There’s all the stuff about, like, I wanna here at a dental school, specialized, this, that, and the other, but the majority of his, about Paige, first of all, there’s a picture of him with his family. He’s wearing regular clothes. He’s not dressed in a dentist outfit. And it talks about, I grew up in this area. Here’s where I went to high school. Here are the sports I played when I grew up. And I think for parents and for kids to see that does make him more relatable. And it’s a really good fit actually for his overall style. Because when you meet him in the office, you can totally picture like running into him at the library or the block party or the supermarket. He just happens to also be your dentist.

 

Julia:

 

A lack of formality, but just a friendliness mm-hmm <affirmative>, especially when you’re in a business where you serve people and you wanna connect with that. That’s where the balance comes in, telling people about your business and also reflecting a part of who you are into that,

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

What businesses should stay away from that. Can you think of any type of professional or personality type or just from the work you’ve done, where you’re like, you know what, stay away from getting personal?

 

Julia:

 

If your corporation and your clientele is other corporations or other businesses. So some law firms might benefit from things like that. Mm-Hmm <affirmative>. So if you’re a personal lawyer or you’re a business lawyer, but you specialize with small, medium sized businesses then sure. But if you’re looking for business, especially in a very niche area or a niche part of law, so in very serious manner like that, where there’s serious litigation, you want to have a professional approach. You don’t want to come across as amateur or unprofessional or immature. If you’re an NGO and you focus on a very serious issue or cause it might not be in your best interest to have that fun, approachable casualness that other businesses can benefit from.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

What are some common mistakes that you see when small businesses are trying to tell their story?

 

Julia:

 

Well, the first mistake I see is not getting a clear understanding of the target.

 

Dr. Ronit

 

And I know that one of the points that you make is that business owners assume that the target is someone like them. And that’s so commonly given as your target is where you were six months ago, a year ago, talk to them like you would yourself. Why is that a mistake?

 

Julia:

 

It’s a mistake because it’s also limiting who your target audience can be with proper background research and market research. You should be able to determine a wider demographic of who can actually benefit from your services. Sure. You may have been in that position yourself. And that’s why a lot of service providers especially get into business because they’re serving a need that they once had. But by opening up your thinking about who can benefit from this, you’re improving your marketing by understanding how wide a scale you can grow your business.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

So how do you figure out how all of these different groups have something in common?

 

Julia:

 

You have to look at the problem that you solve directly. And it takes a little bit of, I guess, creative thinking and understanding your location and understanding your business, the problems you solve, the benefits that you provide. And of course the benefits of the benefits.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

It gets back to that old saying, if you’re trying to speak to everyone, you’re speaking to no one.

 

Julia:

 

Exactly. And when you have all that information and the mistake some people have what their messaging is. They don’t really have a direction. So they know their target audience. They may know who they’re pinpointing with their marketing, but they really don’t have a clear message. Mm-Hmm <affirmative>. So this comes down to technique and how to speak to them. And there’s no long term goal, no overall strategy, no direction to give them the latitude. They need to direct their marketing.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

And so what kind of direction do you want to give your perspective clients or anyone who’s landed on your website or anything having to do with your online presence? What kind of directions do you want to give them?

 

Julia:

 

If you’re selling a product it’s buy now, hit that button, right?

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

<Laugh> right.

 

Julia:

 

Mm-Hmm <affirmative> but like having goals for your business, you know, what you want your business to look like? So what’s a long term goal. You should have an idea of what you wanna hit, what targets you wanna hit at the end of the month. Mm-Hmm <affirmative> and you need to know what you want to promote or what you want to do for this quarter. And of course your marketing needs to reflect that if you want more sales, obviously your company should be about getting leads. And that’s gonna inform your decisions when you tell a good story.

 

So the story is consistent because you’re not going to make up a brand new story about yourself. It sounds like the goals you’re trying to achieve with how you tweak the story is going to be based on what your business goals are now. And later back to your example about the product. If you’re focused on sales, the direction to the customer is click this button by now, if you’re pre-selling a program it’s sign up to get on the waiting list. It sounds like it all comes down to just modifying the call to action.

 

Having a clear call to action in mind. I’ve also understanding what will get people to act on what you’re saying. So if the gear on trying to promote a wait list, what will make someone want to join this wait list? They have to get to know you, your story doesn’t change, but you know that you have to put a bit more emphasis on who you are and creating that general sense of brand awareness.

 

Letting people know who you are as a business, and perhaps even as a person could be important. When it comes to hitting sales, you maybe want to focus a bit more on the product or service yourself. You have to sort of guide people. And that’s where storytelling is. So when you scroll through a website, especially, you know how your pages are ordered in your navigation, you know that sometimes in the menu, there’s this bright button there that’s telling you to buy now, join click here. Mm-Hmm <affirmative>. So that’s about the learning, understanding the customer journey, pointing them in the right direction, nudging them in the right direction,

 

Your content should be digestible. As soon as someone sees it, they should be able to understand it. If they don’t, then you need to revise.

 

Dr. Levy:

 

And so that brings us to making sure that the copy varies from platform to platform because people interact with platforms differently.

 

Julia:

 

This is where you have to examine your tone and your style. So the way you speak is most definitely not the way you write. So if you’re on video on Instagram and you’re focusing on video content, you’ll speak in a, maybe a bit more of a casual tool. Mm-Hmm <affirmative> or you won’t be reading what you would post on Facebook or on Twitter. You won’t be reading your tweets on Instagram, altering that from platform to platform will get you the best results on each platform. Now, Twitter is sweet and short and punchy Instagram. You can do a lot more by showing behind the scenes or being face front. Even some people use Instagram as like a photo blog. Mm-Hmm <affirmative> when they explain their business. So keeping that healthy level of variation is good because people get to see different forms of information and can interact with whichever form they’re more comfortable with.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

So it comes back to an earlier point you made, which is you have to tell the story, but you have to tell a story that your audience is interested in. Hearing mm-hmm <affirmative> interested in, engaging with, can relate to. And then the point you just brought up is in the style or in the way that they’re going to relate to it best.

 

Julia:

 

You can change who you are and what you do based on the platform. So the consistency comes with your brand voice and how you project yourself. What you may change for each platform is just the technique or your style for that particular platform.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

Got it. And then another mistake I know that you see commonly is that people make things overly complicated when they’re writing. And one of the things that you say frequently is when you write for ease, you write with ease. So what does that mean?

 

Julia:

 

Wait, simply put, when you write for easy reading, it’ll be easy for you to write, that’s it? You don’t need to think about using all the technical jargon that you might find in your industry. You don’t need to think about coming across as superficially intelligent or superior that won’t work. Just get the point across as simply as you possibly can. And then someone can scan the information easily. They can interpret that process, that, and then get right onto the call to action.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

Another mistake that you told me, you see a lot of people make, and I think it ties into this is don’t use the whole heavy handed scarcity and urgency, like limited number of seats. Limited time only you have three days. I only have 10 spots when the truth is you have two weeks and you have a hundred spots.

 

Julia:

 

So that’s another thing with marketing. Sure. These are tactics that you can use to improve your conversion rates. And they’re not bad tactics. Like you can use them, just keep it light. Don’t tell someone you have limited spots or three spots available. And then maybe down the line, eight emails later, and three weeks longer, you still have limited spots available. It’s not genuine. It’s not real. And people will catch and say like, this is limited edition, but this has been their all season, right? People catch on. And it creates a level of distrust because they realize, okay, you’re trying to get me to buy. And you’re using this to drive a panic sell. And then after someone who’s made this purchase, and they’re not really thinking about whether or not they need this product or this service, and after they’ve bought it, they have this negative feeling that they now will associate with your product or service because they bought it because it was a panic buy. And that’s where it comes down to authenticity and being genuine in your copy, being authentic and genuine means being true to what your business is and who you are. So there’s no need to go through all these tactics. And you basically put forward misinformation about your business.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

Is there anything that we haven’t covered yet that you think that business owners need to think about when telling their stories based on the different examples you’ve seen based on the different businesses you’ve worked with and that you’ve coached?

 

Julia:

 

Well, I know that there’s a lot of marketing information out there about funnels and sales pages and landing pages. And a big hangup I have is the length of their sales page. Mm-Hmm <affirmative> because they assume that sales pages need to be very long, complex and drag on and on and on because they believe more content means you have more time with a client to get that sale. So you’re nurturing that client as they scroll that page, sometimes keeping it short and simple is the way to

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

I’m so glad you said that because I know I’ve landed on sales pages, where after I’ve read for a couple of minutes, I’m just scrolling at this point to the bottom to see what it is that I have to do next or the fee or when I have until to sign, you know, when you need to sign up by, I don’t need yet another example. I don’t need another picture. The same explanation again, like, right. I just don’t.

 

Julia:

 

You feel like your thumb is getting an exercise if you’re on a mobile view and a lot of you are on their phones. Mm-Hmm <affirmative> so you’re just scrolling. That is if the CTA is placed properly on that web page,

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

I hate when it is placed only all the way at the bottom, because you never know when the person’s going to go. Yeah, I wanna work with this person and there should be a button there.

 

Julia:

 

Exactly. And as a rule of thumb, when you present new information, you don’t know if that’s the piece of information that your ideal target needs for someone to click and think, yeah, I need to work with this person. Mm-Hmm <affirmative>. So as you introduce new information, that’s where you put that CTA. So you break up your content that way.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

So is there anything else that business owners should be thinking about when they’re telling their story that you wanna make sure that we cover?

 

Julia:

 

I did mention this before. Mm-Hmm, <affirmative>, it’s really about thinking about who you are and who you, what your business is about and what void you wanna fill in your market. You are there to sell something. You are here to sell a service, a product, and there should be no shame about that. What you need to do is think about your values and how you wanna go about doing that. I have a client who had a hotel and they were in the city and they were right in front of a very busy street. And they were focused on getting new clients who are business oriented because of their proximity to other amenities in the cityscape. But one of their unique selling propositions was the atmosphere of the hotel itself. As soon as you closed that door, when you entered the lobby, it was like day and night.

 

Overwhelming sense of calm, especially when you contrast that to the busing street and passerbys and all of that. So that was a really big part of how they marketed their business. Not only is this a place for business professionals, but this is a place where you can find true peace in a busy city scape. It’s not a big, fancy feature that they have like a breakfast bar. It’s just the atmosphere of the place. Yeah. It’s such a simple thing that if you’re in your own business, you would take for granted, but with a fresh take, you can say, oh, this is actually something that’s very unique and something that people can appreciate, especially in a hotel.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

What are some pointers that you would give a business when thinking about how to describe or come up with these points of how they’re different that they might just take for granted?

 

Julia:

 

Well, first thing you need to do is just take a fresh perspective. And that’s really hard when you’re in your own business. Mm-Hmm <affirmative>. So if you can get a trusted professional or someone who’s an external party to come guide you with that, that’s fairly helpful to get external advice because that fresh take can really change your marketing direction. But if you’re able to take a few steps back and just go through your business or approach it like a client and not as an owner, you’ll be able to understand what you can improve on and what your real strengths are. So if you notice, does people keep saying that they feel empowered when they work with you? What aspects about your business? Do you think empowers them think about what you keep hearing from your clients.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

And it’s also helpful in terms of using those words to communicate it to them.

 

Julia:

 

Yes, because if it’s consistent that your current clients feel this way, when someone works with you and they start experiencing the same benefits or the same features that you offer, then they get to understand. And it really clicks for them like, oh, this is true. This is truth in content. This is truth in marketing that just reinforces our relationship.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

Truth in marketing is so rare these days. And I think most people expect they’re being either worked or played, or however you want to put it being truthful and being transparent to a certain extent can actually be something that sets you apart from your competition.

 

Julia:

 

Right? A lot of marketing tactics like urgency and scarcity, people see through all the shorthand tactics and people are usually let down by them. It just creates this wider gap between the consumer and other businesses, because people need to trust you. And when they do trust you, you have to maintain that integrity. I think a lot of consumers are knowledgeable about marketing practices. People know when you’re open and honest, when you’re not constantly shifting your story,

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

It ultimately ties back to where we started, which is you really focus on helping brands and businesses be consistent, show up with integrity and looking to make an impact and more than anything, looking to build a long term relationship with their clients and within their communities, instead of chasing trends. It’s more about following these, just guiding principles within your copy, no matter where you’re creating copy, whether that’s on a website for video, for social media, you’ll ultimately build the know, like, and trust factor. And it seems like no matter how marketing changes, no like, and trust never seems to go out of style.

 

Julia:

 

Trust. Isn’t something that can go out of style. It simply is. It’s not a trend. It’s ethical and it’s a value for a business and it’s a solid value. And it’s something people really do care about.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

That’s fantastic. Thank you, Julia, for reminding us of that, especially when we’re faced with such a noisy marketplace, each of us in our own industries. And especially once we get on the internet and social media.

 

Julia:

 

Oh, you’re welcome. It was a pleasure to be here with you.

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

Thank you. And so I will put all of the links to how people can get in touch with you in the show notes, but just to let people know who prefer to hear it, what’s the best way to get in touch with you. If someone would like to connect over what they heard today?

 

Julia:

 

Well, you can visit my website and that’s just JuliaClementson.com. And you can contact me there, learn a bit more about me and what I do and how I work

 

Dr. Ronit:

 

And just FY everyone. It’s a really, really good website. So I highly recommend checking it out. You really do get a feel for how Julia works, how she writes and how she can help you. And I know this because I contacted her from that website. <Laugh> so thanks very much, Julia. And I hope to talk to you again soon. Take care.

 

Conclusion to the episode (by Dr. Ronit Levy):

 

Thanks for joining me on this episode of the Business in Between Podcast.

 

If you enjoyed this episode and want more information on growing your business on your terms, make sure to join the Simple SEO Systems email community.

 

You’ll get exclusive content and tools to help you grow your business without all of the overwhelm. It’s also a really easy way to get in touch with me.

 

Head over towww.SimpleSEOSystems.comto sign up. 

 

I’m Dr. Ronit Levy. Thanks for joining me today. Talk to you soon.

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